Jane's Book Club - Summer Reads 2018.

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1. Little Fires Everywhere, Celeste Ng. 
Recommended by Danielle DeAngelo & Jacey Lambros

Mia starts as Mrs. Richardon's tenant, then becomes her housekeeper, then a mentor and secret keeper for her children; Pearl falls into a love triangle with the two Richardson boys. Like Shaker Heights, "Little Fires Everywhere" is meticulously planned, every storyline and detail placed with obvious purpose.


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2. Tiny Beautiful Things, Cheryl Strayed.
Recommended by Renee Frangione

Cheryl Strayed's Dear Sugar columns give us 'a very real sense of a complicated, painful life behind the advice'. Cheryl Strayed is already something of a phenomenon in the US, where her hiking memoir, Wild, held the No 1 spot on the New York Times bestseller list for seven consecutive weeks last year. You can buy the book here.


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3. The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo, Amy Schumer.
Recommended by Katie Hamrah

In The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo, Amy mines her past for stories about her teenage years, her family, relationships, and sex and shares the experiences that have shaped who she is—a woman with the courage to bare her soul to stand up for what she believes in, all while making us laugh.

 


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4. You Are a Badass, Jen Cincero.
Recommended by Mazz Mazzeo

You are a Badass by Jen Sincero is an entertaining read with plenty of real-world advice. Her book aims to empower any readers and teach you how to stop doubting yourself and get stuff done. Sincero helps to identify key problems in everyone's life, she then explains how best to combat these hurdles and live the best life you can. Whether you want to start a business, learn how to make extra money or get another job this book is an excellent guide!


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5. Dear Ijeawele, or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. 
Recommended by Margaret Barschow

A few years ago, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie received a letter from a childhood friend, a new mother who wanted to know how to raise her baby girl to be a feminist. Dear Ijeawele is Adichie’s letter of response: fifteen invaluable suggestions—direct, wryly funny, and perceptive—for how to empower a daughter to become a strong, independent woman. Filled with compassionate guidance and advice, it gets right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century, and starts a new and urgently needed conversation about what it really means to be a woman today.